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Cape Peninsula Map

About Cape Peninsula

From Slangkop (snake head) Point in the west and along a chain of mountains bordering Fish Hoek in the east before heading down to Cape Point, the Cape Peninsula is a one of the few remaining areas of untouched beauty in this part of the world.

The Cape Peninsula incorporates small sea... read more

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More info about Cape Peninsula

From Slangkop (snake head) Point in the west and along a chain of mountains bordering Fish Hoek in the east before heading down to Cape Point, the Cape Peninsula is a one of the few remaining areas of untouched beauty in this part of the world.

The Cape Peninsula incorporates small seaside villages on the Atlantic Ocean to the west and is the end point of the False Bay coast in the east. Much of the Cape Peninsula is made up of the Table Mountain chain and the Cape Point Nature Reserve.

At first glance, the undeveloped areas might appear barren scrubland, but a closer look shows a substantial plant life numbering into the thousands where many tiny creatures, various buck species, ostriches and small mammals happily survive.

The beaches are pristine with choppy waters that colour the seas different hues and lighthouses are spread along the coastline.

Holiday makers seeking absolute peace will do well to find one of the many lodging gems located here.

 

Top 6 reasons to visit the Cape Peninsula

1. Visit the cast iron Slangkop lighthouse outside Kommetjie. Climb the spiral steps to reach the 33m high balcony for excellent sea and mountain views.

2. The road from Slangkop to Cape Point is a continuation of one of the world’s greatest marine drives. Travel the road past Misty Cliffs, a photographer’s dream location, via the artists retreat of Scarborough with its oddly-shaped camel rock before reaching the wild and remote Cape Point.

3. Swim in the tidal pools at the Soetwater (sweet water) resort. The area is ecologically sensitive, however, catching of lobster and fishing is allowed in season. The resort has grassed picnic areas as well as an environmental centre.  

4. The working ostrich breeding farm opposite Cape Point entrance gives the visitor an insight into the lifecycle of the world’s largest bird. Guided tours are offered and the farm has an on-site restaurant.

5. The vast Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve was proclaimed in 1939 and has a number of attractions. Several shipwrecks are still visible at certain viewpoints, an old lime kiln has been restored along a stretch of pristine beach, animals roam the reserve and a funicular transports visitors to the old lighthouse (walking up is a better option). The reserve has an excellent restaurant.

6. Miller’s Point on the False Bay side has a public slipway used by commercial fishermen and recreational dive boats. Buy your fresh fish directly off the boats upon the fishermen’s return.

 

Transport

The nearest airport is Cape Town International, approximately 40km from the Cape Peninsula. A train service operates from nearby Simon’s Town to Cape Town city. Fish Hoek has two car rental agencies; however, car rental bookings can be organised online. A few metered taxi companies operate from bases nearby. If you have the Uber app, order a taxi via your mobile phone. There are many transport companies based in and around the peninsula that offer shuttle services between Cape Town and the airport.

 

Did you know?

The Chacma baboon is the only baboon sub-species to include marine life in their diet and are regularly seen on the Cape Point beaches scavenging for limpets and other shellfish.

Two dangerous rocks, Bellows Rock west of Cape Point and Whittle Rock off Miller’s Point in False Bay are navigational hazards and have been responsible for many shipwrecks, the best known being the SS Lusitania that hit Bellows Rock in 1911. Waves can be seen crashing around these rocks from various viewpoints at Cape Point.