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About Holocaust Centre

A visit to the first Holocaust Centre in Africa is a sobering experience. While there are very few surviving individuals who experienced the horrors of World War II and the subsequent extermination of 6 million Jews, it is places like the Holocaust Centre in Cape Town that is a frightening rem... read more

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More info about Holocaust Centre

A visit to the first Holocaust Centre in Africa is a sobering experience. While there are very few surviving individuals who experienced the horrors of World War II and the subsequent extermination of 6 million Jews, it is places like the Holocaust Centre in Cape Town that is a frightening reminder to us all of how discrimination can easily lead to genocide. Many South Africans are all too aware of the consequences of discrimination and can sympathise with those families destroyed by Nazism.

The Holocaust Centre is a place of remembrance and contains a host of photographs, audio material, old film reels and memorabilia donated by citizens. The multimedia displays are tastefully presented but some are difficult to watch.

Established by the South African Holocaust and Genocide Foundation, there are 2 other Holocaust centres in Johannesburg and Durban, however, Cape Town was the site chosen for the initial centre. Nelson Mandela’s message at the centre’s 1999 opening was that he likened the struggle of his people to that of the Jews and described how the memory of the Holocaust would help to build a better South African nation where all people and their religions would be respected.

To access the Cape Town Holocaust Centre requires an entrance fee into the South African Jewish Museum which is also attached to the historic Jewish Synagogue, the first of its kind in the country.  The centre is on the hop on-hop off bus route and is closed on Saturdays.

A visit to the Holocaust Centre will leave you saddened, yet with a renewed outlook to both tolerate differences in people and to treat each other with kindness.